Greenwich Tree Conservancy Branches Out to Bruce Park

Bruce Park has been spruced up with some new signage.

The Greenwich Tree Conservancy hosted a tree walk on Sunday in Bruce Park to celebrate the expansion of its Arboretum Initiative. The walk—essentially a tour of the park’s trees—emphasized new plaques put in by the organization that indicate the different types of trees in the park. The tree walk was led by Town Tree Warden Bruce Spaman and Secretary of the Greenwich Tree Conservancy Mark Greenwald.

Town Tree Warden Bruce Spaman and Secretary of the Greenwich Tree Conservancy Mark Greenwald getting ready to lead the tree walk. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

Town Tree Warden Bruce Spaman and Secretary of the Greenwich Tree Conservancy Mark Greenwald getting ready to lead the tree walk. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

The Greenwich Tree Conservancy put up many new plaques in Bruce Park to indicate the type of tree. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

The Greenwich Tree Conservancy put up many new plaques in Bruce Park to indicate the type of tree. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

The tree walk was preceded by words from the Greenwich Tree Conservancy’s board—including Executive Director JoAnn Messina, Co-chairs Leslie Lee and Susie Baker, and President Peter Malkin.

Members of the Greenwich Tree Conservancy board (from left to right): Co-chairs Leslie Lee and Susie Baker, and President Peter Malkin. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

Members of the Greenwich Tree Conservancy board (from left to right): Co-chairs Leslie Lee and Susie Baker, and President Peter Malkin. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

The non-profit organization started ten years ago when Greenwich Tree Conservancy President Peter Malkin and his wife noticed that many trees in their neighborhood were growing old. The couple began planting trees on their own property, and from there, the organization grew into the private-public organization that it is today.

Greenwich Tree Conservancy has planted 2,800 trees throughout the town and has grown to about 400 due-paying members. The organization continues to plant and revitalize trees in town, educate the community on the benefit of these trees, and advocate for policies that will protect the trees and their habitat.

“It’s all about planting the right trees in the right places,” said Malkin on why it’s important to plant only trees that are native to Connecticut.

A map showing the walking routes where trees have been marked by new plaques. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

A map showing the walking routes where trees have been marked by new plaques. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

Attendees gather to listen to board members speak about the Greenwich Tree Conservancy. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

Attendees gather to listen to board members speak about the Greenwich Tree Conservancy. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

Both local and state representatives attended the event to support the town’s tree conservancy initiative.

State Representative Livvy Floren, who is also a board member of the Greenwich Tree Conservancy, congratulated the organization on its leadership.

“To paraphrase one of my favorite quotations: A single act of leadership throws out roots in all directions, and the roots spring up and make new trees,” said Floren.

State Representative Livvy Floren congratulated the Greenwich Tree Conservancy for its leadership. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

State Representative Livvy Floren congratulated the Greenwich Tree Conservancy for its leadership. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

First Selectman Peter Tesei was also in attendance. He said that he supports the organization’s continued stewardship in tree conservancy throughout the town, and that he supports the education of tree canopy to people who may not be as knowledgeable about the subject.

Greenwich Tree Conservancy board members Mary Hull and Leslie Lee welcome First Selectman Peter Tesei to the event. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

Greenwich Tree Conservancy board members Mary Hull and Leslie Lee welcome First Selectman Peter Tesei to the event. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

Local tree-loving residents also went to the event. Troudy Gouse, a resident of Cos Cob, went to last year’s tree walk at Bruce Park and the tree walk at Greenwich Point.

“People come to the park, but they don’t appreciate the trees, so it’s great to gain some knowledge about them,” said Gouse.

Sandie Heath, another resident of Cos Cob, went along with Gouse to the event. Heath commented on the importance that trees can have in a community.

“If you go to the park first, you capture the soul of a place,” she said.

A group of Greenwich residents on the tree walk at Bruce Park. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

A group of Greenwich residents on the tree walk at Bruce Park. May 21, 2017. Photo: Devon Bedoya

The Greenwich Tree Conservancy is hosting a woodwind concert on June 25 at the Seaside Garden at Greenwich Point to celebrate the organization’s tenth anniversary. The woodwind concert will be held to honor and celebrate Greenwich’s many trees.


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  • Thanks to all those who make our parks better!