Exam Stress? Greenwich Hospital Healing Touch Volunteers Help Refresh, Relax GHS Students

healing touch volunteers from Greenwich Hospital

Healing Touch volunteers included Kay Woodard, Martha Taylor, Roberta Brown Brugo, Birgit Mensel and Wendy Cushman at Greenwich High School on Jan. 21, 2016 Credit Leslie Yager

GHS senior Molly Arnone was operating on just a few hours of sleep on Thursday and said she was experiencing anxiety over her mid term exams, and that her shoulders felt heavy.

Ten minutes after a visit with the Healing Touch volunteers set up in the foyer outside what was once the auditorium, she felt much better.

“I feel balanced, whole,” Molly said. “I fell like I breathed out my negative energy. Even my head feels lighter,” she said.

Healing TouchHer friend Akane Edwards, a junior, said she felt refreshed and the experience made her see colors.

A few minutes later, Coach Lapham stopped by. Then science teacher, John DeLuca. And eventually Kathy Steiner, who is a GHS health teacher who organizes the visits of Healing Touch volunteers during exams and at the health fair.

The Healing Touch volunteers will return to GHS on Tuesday and everyone is invited to give it a try, or to return for another visit.

Coach Lapham takes a few minutes to visit the Healing Touch volunteers on Jan. 20, 2016 Credit: Leslie Yager

Coach Lapham takes a few minutes to visit the Healing Touch volunteers. Afterward, coach Lapham said he felt calm and refreshed, not tired. Jan. 20, 2016 Credit: Leslie Yager

According to Roberta Brown Brugo, the Healing Touch volunteers have been visiting GHS for four or five years. A registered nurse and certified Healing Touch practitioner, Mrs. Brown Brugo described the technique as an energy therapy that helps people feel calm and relaxed.

“It works on emotional, mental and spiritual well-being,” she said. “We look at the whole person.”

Volunteer Kay Woodard said ordinarily their volunteer services are provided to clients who are older, and are sick or in physical therapy.  “This is a little different. Whereas with our typical clients we’re trying to relieve pain, here we helping to clear people’s minds. It’s about stabilizing and balancing.”

Healing Touch

Healing Touch volunteers work with students at Greenwich High School, Jan. 21, 2016 Credit: Leslie Yager

Woodard said her first GHS client fell asleep, which she interpreted as the ultimate compliment. “There was a big football player who was skeptical, but he was won over,” she said.

Martha Taylor said it is amazing to see the look of total relaxation on the students’ faces.

Mrs. Brown Brugo said the goal is to help people become calm and relaxed, reduce stress and anxiety. “It can be for just a sense of well-being,” she said. “It brings people back to the present moment and they observe their breath flowing in and flowing out.”

See also:

Putting High School Stress to Bed: GHS ’15 Grad Explores High School vs College Stress

What GHS Students Gladly Line up For? Healing Touch Volunteers from Greenwich Hospital

Greenwich High School Gets Real about AIDS, HIV and Sexual Health

Focus on Mental Health at GHS Health Fair

Combating Stress: GHS Students Get Tips for Self-Care

Kathy Steiner

Kathy Steiner, GHS wellness teacher, visits a Healing Touch volunteer who traveled from Greenwich Hospital to the high school on Jan. 21, 2016 Credit Leslie Yager

mid terms, Healing Touch volunteers

Healing Touch volunteers at Greenwich High School for the first of two visits during mid-term exam week. Credit: Leslie Yager

chocolate

Healing Touch Relaxation session finishes with a piece of chocolate. Nice!

Molly Arnone

Molly Arnone and fellow GHS students take a moment to relax during mid-terms on Jan. 21, 2016 Credit: Leslie Yager

Healing Touch

Students stopped at the calming oasis provided by Greenwich Hospital Healing Touch volunteers on Thursday, Jan. 121, 2016. Credit: Leslie Yager

 


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