Tiny New York Kitchen: Deviled Eggs Four Ways

Screen Shot 2014-04-26 at 9.46.46 AMBy Victoria Hart Glavin of Tiny New York Kitchen 

I like basic deviled eggs, but if you’d like to mix it up a bit here are some unique deviled egg options for you and your family.

Basic Deviled Eggs

INGREDIENTS

  • 6 Hard Boiled Eggs
  • 1/4 Cup Mayonnaise
  • 1 Teaspoon Mustard (I Like To Use Yellow Mustard)
  • 1 Teaspoon Vinegar
  • Paprika (Optional)
  • Parsley Sprigs (Optional)

Boil eggs and remove shells. Halve eggs lengthwise and gently remove yolks. Set Whites aside. Place yolks in small bowl and mash with a fork. Add mayonnaise, mustard, and vinegar. Mix well. If desired season with kosher salt and pepper. Stuff egg white halves with yolk mixture. Cover and chill until serving time (up to 24 hours). If desired, garnish with paprika and/or parsley. Makes 12 Deviled Eggs

Greek Deviled Eggs

Prepare as above except fold 2 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese, 1 tablespoon finely chopped pitted kalamata olives, and 2 teaspoons snipped fresh oregano into yolk mixture.

Curry & Crab Deviled Eggs
Prepare as above, except omit mustard and vinegar. Stir mayonnaise, 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard, 1 teaspoon snipped fresh chives, and 1/2 teaspoon curry powder into mashed yolks. Mix well. Fold in 1/4 cup crabmeat.

Chipotle Deviled Eggs
Prepare as above, except omit mayonnaise, mustard, and vinegar. Stir 1/4  cup sour cream, 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion, and 1 teaspoon finely chopped canned chipotle peppers in adobo sauce into yolk mixture.

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Victoria Hart Glavin has been cooking and writing recipes since she was a teenager. Originally from Nebraska, her appreciation for culinary technique took off when she moved to Lyon, France.

While living in France, Victoria studied French cooking from an expert Lyonnais chef. Victoria learned to love the local culture of preparing and enjoying fresh, seasonal foods. While in France, Victoria experienced the joys of shopping for local produce at the market and preparing fresh foods simply and beautifully in order to enhance the experience of the table. During her time in France, she says she “learned how to squeeze tomatoes at the local market” and “took everything in by osmosis.”

Currently, Victoria creates tasty treats in her tiny kitchen, in New York City, for all to enjoy and on weekends she explores Fairfield County where has a second home. Victoria has shared her recipes with others and now you can enjoy the Tiny New York Kitchen recipe collection, too!  Victoria is a member of Culinary Historians of New York and a member of the Association for the Study of Food and Society.

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