Tiny New York Kitchen: Roasted Garlic Purée

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By Victoria Hart Glavin of Tiny New York Kitchen

Try using Roasted Garlic Purée as a condiment on anything you like. The process of roasting garlic is mostly hands-off, and the roasted garlic purée will keep in the refrigerator for up to one week, so it’s handy to have a stash available for spreading on sandwiches, stirring into soups, mixing into hamburgers, or using it any other way you can think of.

Ingredients

6 Large Heads Of Garlic

1/2 Teaspoon Kosher Salt

1/3 Cup Olive Oil

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. With sharp knife, cut 1/4 inch off top of garlic heads (pointed end) so that the individual cloves are visible. Place garlic in small-size baking dish (cut side up) and sprinkle with kosher salt. Drizzle with olive oil. Make sure olive oil drips between cloves.

Cover baking dish with aluminum foil and place in oven for 20 minutes.

Remove foil and cook another 20 minutes. You will want garlic to be very soft and caramelized. Remove from oven and let cool. Squeeze soft roasted garlic cloves into small-size bowl. Mash garlic to form a paste. Add a bit of roasting oil from baking pan. Transfer to storage container with lid and place in refrigerator until ready to use. Makes about 1/2 cup

Prep Time: 10 Minutes
Cook Time: 40 Minutes
Total Time: 50 Minutes


Victoria Hart Glavin has been cooking and writing recipes since she was a teenager. Originally from Nebraska, her appreciation for culinary technique took off when she moved to Lyon, France.

While living in France, Victoria studied French cooking from an expert Lyonnais chef. Victoria learned to love the local culture of preparing and enjoying fresh, seasonal foods. While in France, Victoria experienced the joys of shopping for local produce at the market and preparing fresh foods simply and beautifully in order to enhance the experience of the table. During her time in France, she says she “learned how to squeeze tomatoes at the local market” and “took everything in by osmosis.”

Currently, Victoria creates tasty treats in her tiny kitchen, in New York City, for all to enjoy and on weekends she explores Fairfield County where has a second home. Victoria has shared her recipes with others and now you can enjoy the Tiny New York Kitchen recipe collection, too!  Victoria is a member of Culinary Historians of New York and a member of the Association for the Study of Food and Society.

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